May 18, 2023

MAY IS MENTAL HEALTH MONTH - LET'S TALK ABOUT IT

Remember when people used to talk about cancer in whispers? When they used to call it “The Big C”? What if you said “cancer” out loud? Would you be tempting fate? Would you catch it? What about “breast cancer”? To me, that was the scariest of all the cancers. It had the word “breast” in the name. Oof. No thank you. Way too personal. For a long time there was only mystery and confusion.


Fortunately we are more knowledgeable now. We have cancer screenings to aid in early detection. We have treatments to fight it. We are more educated and we have moved past the pointed fingers and hushed conversations in the corner. Public figures, such as Betty Ford in the 1970s and more recently celebrities such as Christina Applegate, Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Katie Couric have shared their experiences with breast cancer and helped to make talk around the subject less taboo. And every October, women all over the world, as well as men and children, now proudly sport breast cancer ribbons and wear pink to raise awareness and support their loved ones with breast cancer.

Women wearing "mental Health matters" shirt

May is Mental Health Awareness Month and is a great opportunity to start a conversation about mental health.


Fortunately we are more knowledgeable now. We have cancer screenings to aid in early detection. We have treatments to fight it. We are more educated and we have moved past the pointed fingers and hushed conversations in the corner. Public figures, such as Betty Ford in the 1970s and more recently celebrities such as Christina Applegate, Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Katie Couric have shared their experiences with breast cancer and helped to make talk around the subject less taboo. And every October, women all over the world, as well as men and children, now proudly sport breast cancer ribbons and wear pink to raise awareness and support their loved ones with breast cancer.


We also need to raise awareness of, educate people about and erase the stigma surrounding mental health disorders. The prevalence of these conditions in the United States far surpasses that of breast cancer, with approximately 57.8 million affected compared to 3.8 million. In addition,

  • One in five American adults are living with a mental health condition

  • One in six American youth aged 6 - 17 experience a mental health disorder each year

  • Suicide is the second leading cause of death in those aged 10 - 14


We need to start talking about mental health the way we now talk about cancer - openly and compassionately. Talking about mental health is important for several reasons

  • Reducing stigma: By openly discussing mental health, we can promote understanding and empathy. This can encourage individuals to seek help without fear of judgment or shame.

  • Raising awareness: Increased awareness can lead to better understanding, early detection, and intervention.

  • Encouraging help-seeking behavior: By normalizing conversations about mental health, individuals are more likely to feel comfortable seeking help or reaching out to support networks.

  • Promoting overall well-being: By openly discussing mental health, we acknowledge its significance and encourage its inclusion in overall self-care.

May is Mental Health Awareness Month and is a great opportunity to start a conversation about mental health. Share your stories, provide support, and encourage others to seek help when needed. By promoting empathy, understanding, and acceptance, we can make a difference in the lives of those struggling with mental health challenges.


NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, has declared this year's theme as "More Than Enough". It means that no matter who you are, what your diagnosis is, what your abilities are, whatever you did today, you are more than enough. By promoting this message you can help to create an environment where mental health is openly discussed, supported, and understood. Together we can raise awareness, help erase the stigma and remind those who are struggling that they are more than enough.



Written by Robyn Sabel 

Founder of Buttercup & Joy


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Robyn Sabel is the founder of Buttercup & Joy. Robyn has loved ones that have struggled with their mental health and she knows it can be difficult, frustrating and isolating for them and their families. She started Buttercup & Joy to let people know that there is hope that things can get better and that they are not alone on this journey. Buttercup & Joy is a woman-owned, stigma-free business dedicated to supporting the mental health community. Part of their profits are donated to NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness.


Buttercup & Joy is jewelry with a meaning. Each bracelet is accompanied by inspirational message cards relating to mental health to provide the wearer with little reminders of hope, motivation and support. Buttercup & Joy is here to help you face the day! 


SHOP bUTTERCUP & JOY


CONTINUE READING

Her Story - 1 People
Susan Elderkin · August 19, 2022 Her Story: Rea Tjoa Algreen, 1...
Juneteenth: America's Newest Holiday
After years of inaction on the part of the U.S. Senate and...
Blog Post: HER-Commerce Re-Launches!
WMarketplace Relaunches HER-Commerce™  Last fall, we surveyed over 6500 women-owned businesses to...

Launched in 2020, TheWMarketplace is a nationwide e-commerce marketplace for women-owned businesses to sell their products and professional and personal services. Offering favorable terms to its sellers, it also is a supportive community of women entrepreneurs that have access to learning opportunities through the trademarked HER-Commerce™ programs. With over 500 women-owned businesses selling 4000+ products and services ranging from home goods to coaching, in over 35 states, TheWMarketplace empowers shoppers with a new way to find the communities they want to support, including Black-woman owned, Latina-owned, AAPI-owned, Veteran woman-owned, and more. The Her Story Q&A is one benefit TheWMarketplace provides to sellers.

Guest Writer: Robyn Sabel - May is Mental Health Month: Let’s Talk About It